The camera you have with you...

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It's often said that the best camera you have is the one you have with you at the time. If you have more than one camera, as many readers will have, then things get confusing. Having said that, I suppose the point of the message still stands - the camera in your hand is the best one you have. The point, obviously, is that you could have the best Leica have to offer sat in your hotel safe but if you only have your mobile phone with you when you are out and about, then the mobile phone is the best camera.

It's not really true, and I don't really like phrases such as this, but it does make a valid point. Now more than ever, as even cheap mobile phones have better cameras than point and shoot cameras of a few years ago.

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A couple of posts ago, I asked readers which photo was taken with my phone and which was taken with my much more expensive Sony camera. Most people got it wrong. In a way, I suppose it was a trick question, or at least, some people would not say it was a fair test. The photos were not "raw" - they were processed how I typically process my photos. I didn't really care about a raw image comparison. There, the proper camera always wins. It has higher dynamic range, a huge sensor, better lenses, and loads more detail and colour. 

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However, on the web, compressed and edited JPEGS can all start to look alike - and that was the point I was making.

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There's no message here, other than don't worry too much about not having your "real" camera with you. Just take a photo with your phone if you must.

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Or, often even better, simply don't take any photo at all and just enjoy the moment.

Zurich

Zurich


All photos taken with iPhone SE